The taxi driver who rushed a worried father to the grounds of the Route 91 Harvest Festival Sunday is speaking out. John Zerquera-Jimenez drove the worried father who got in his cab as they sped to the area of the concert shooting. The daughter, Ashley, her husband and several others crammed in the back of the cab, but the driver didn't mind.


A high school football coach invited a homeless player to live with him and his family and changed his life forever. CNN's Dianne Gallagher reports.


Tom Holland is set to swing on the silver screen this weekend as Spider-Man in the upcoming 'Spider-Man: Homecoming,' but the British actor secretly went to classes in New York City to prep for the role. The Peter Parker/Spider-Man character hails from Queens, NY, and the British star wanted to make sure he got as close to the persona as possible. So, he secretly enrolled at The Bronx High School of Science, one of the best public schools in New York City.


More from Inside Edition: In the middle of rural Kansas, armed security patrol the entrance to a doomsday bunker that's reserved for the wealthy elite and sales are booming. Inside Edition headed deep below the surface of the Earth and into an underground bunker like no other. Larry Hall, the owner of the Survival Condo Project says, Since the election of Donald Trump we have seen a whole new demographic of people calling in. People we didn't know they existed before.


If you're on the shore and witness a tragedy unfolding, Sacramento Fire Department Captain Brian Gonsalves has advice: Stay calm. It comes after a group of friends were hanging out at a river on a hot afternoon and one was swept away by the current. Captain Gonsalves says only go in the water as a last-ditch effort. For more follow the hashtag HowToSurvive


Man Exacts Revenge On Package Thieves With Trap That Fires Shotgun Blanks. All you'll need to make your own: 12-gauge shotgun blanks, fishing line, bricks, a wooden box, an aluminium carrying vessel for the blanks, a small plate and a cardboard box. A fed-up driver has engineered an ingenious “shotgun” trap in an effort to deter thieves who steal packages from front porches. Jaireme Barrow, from Tacoma, Washington, was becoming increasingly irritated with people nicking his expensive Jeep parts and vowed to “even the playing field”.Using 12-gauge shotgun blanks, fishing line, bricks, a wooden box, an aluminium carrying vessel for the blanks, a small plate and a cardboard box he crafted his opus


Miami preschoolers Jia Sarnicola and Zuri Copeland say they are not just best friends. In fact, Jia and Zuri truly believe they're twins. They're just 4 years old, but grown-ups could learn a lot from them. Steve Hartman reports, On The Road. Subscribe to the CBS Evening News Channel HERE: Watch Full Episodes of the CBS Evening News HERE: Watch the latest installment of On the Road, only on the CBS Evening News, HERE: Follow CBS Evening News on Instagram: Like CBS Evening News on Facebook HERE: Follow the CBS Evening News on Twitter HERE: Follow the CBS Evening News on Google+ HERE: Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! --- The CBS Evening News premiered as a half-hour broadcast on Sept. 2, 1963. Check local listings for CBS Evening News broadcast times.


What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: Instagram: While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Colorado resident Michael Kent recently sat down at a tattoo parlor in Colorado Springs to have his swastikas covered up. Follow reporter Michael Koenigs @MikeOnABikeABC for more profile pieces. Kent, a former neo-Nazi, credits an African-American parole officer named Tiffany Whittier with helping him to see beyond skin color and changing his views about white supremacy. “If it wasn’t for her I would have seeped back into it,” said Kent. “I look at her as family.” Whittier, 45, even inspired Kent, 38, to take down the Nazi flags he had hanging in his living room and replace them with smiley faces. “I’m not here to judge him. That’s not my job to judge. My job is to be that positive person in someone’s life,” Whittier said. Added Kent, “When you wake up and see a smiley face, you’re going to go to work and you’re going to smile.” PHOTO: Former skinhead Michael Kent gives his former parole officer Tiffany Whittier a hug after she surprises him at his home.ABC News Former skinhead Michael Kent gives his former parole officer Tiffany Whittier a hug after she surprises him at his home.more + Kent now works full-time on a chicken farm in Colorado, where all his co-workers are Hispanic. “Before all this, I wouldn’t work for anybody or with anybody that wasn’t white,” said Kent. “[Now] we have company parties, or they have quinceañeras, I’m the only white guy there!” Redemption Ink, a national non-profit that offers free removals of hate-related tattoos, helped connect Kent with Fallen Heroes Tattoo in Colorado to begin the 15-hour process of covering his swastikas. The sterile environment is new to Kent who had his previous ink work done in prison. “I’ve never, never, never been inside of a tattoo shop getting a professional tattoo,” he said. Kent believes the painful process will help him move forward after spending years as a member of a violent skinhead group based in Arizona. As a father of two young children, Kent also hopes his children will see the world differently. “I don’t want my kids to live the life I lived and live with hate,” said Kent. “I want my kids to know me for who I am now—a good father, a hard worker, and a good provider.” SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: Watch More on LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE:


Millions of people are purchasing and using home DNA kits to determine their ancestry. Inside Edition enlisted the help of two sets triplets and a set of quadruplets to investigate the accuracy of the at-home tests. Their ancestry should be absolutely identical since they all came from the same egg. Unfortunately, the reveal confused and disappointed the sisters because of the varied results. The set of quadruplets were almost identical and did not have the variations seen in the triplets.


Photo colorization artists use a combination of research, physics, and technology to digitally reconstruct history's black and white record. Artist links: Jordan Lloyd (@jordanjlloydhq): Mads Madsen (@Madsmadsench): Marina Amaral (@marinamaral2): Dana Keller (@HistoryInColor): Patty Allison (@imbuedwithhues): The Paper Time Machine: Photo colorization isn’t just coloring within the lines — it requires meticulous research to make sure that every detail is historically accurate. The color of military uniforms, signs, vehicles, and world fashion spanning decades needs to be accounted for before even opening digital software like Photoshop. That means digging through sources like diaries, government records, old advertisements, and even consulting historical experts to get the colors right. But even after the arduous research, restoration, and blending of color, the image still isn’t finished. In order to achieve true photorealism, the physics of how light works in the atmosphere needs to be taken into account. Colors look different depending on the lighting conditions when the photo was taken, so artists rely on shadows and the location of light to make an educated guess about the time of day in a black-and-white photo. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Pres. Barack Obama breaks down in tears when talking about First Lady Michelle Obama: For the past 25 years, you have not only been my wife and mother of my children, you have been my best friend.you’ve made me proud. You’ve made the country proud. SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: Watch More on LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE:


Inspired by the super twin who saved his brother beneath a fallen dresser - here are 10 kids who came to the rescue to save their friends and family! For more: SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: Watch More on LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE:


Niko Kollias tells ESPN Outside the Lines about his ordeal while on the University of Rochester football team when he was shot and brutally beaten.


9/11 was a turning point in every facet of American society — including cinema. Subscribe to our channel! In September of 2001, Disney was approaching final cut on Lilo & Stitch — a children's film set for release in early 2002. The climax of the film initially featured Stitch piloting a 747 through a fictional Hawaiian city. But that urban backdrop was replaced with a mountainous backdrop, and the aircraft was re-worked to look like an alien spacecraft. The changes were informed by the shift in the mood in America following the terrorist attacks on 9/11. Disney wasn't alone in their obligation to rework content to a more appropriate tone for a nation still reeling from the attacks. Children's shows like Power Rangers, Pokemon, and Invader Zim had episodes taken off the air due to scenes where buildings and cityscapes were destroyed. The nation had changed, and the national conversation facilitated by popular culture had changed alongside it. To trace these developments in greater detail, read this write-up from Lindsay Ellis: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


In an NBC News exclusive, TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie sat down with Selena Gomez and her best friend, Francia Raisa, to talk about the kidney transplant that Gomez says saved her life after she was diagnosed with lupus five years ago. “My kidneys were just done,” Gomez says in the emotional interview. » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: Selena Gomez Speaks Out About Kidney Transplant From Her Best Friend Francia Raisa | TODAY


Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: Subscribe to our channel here: Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of tunnel boom, where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Shigeru Miyamoto's design philosophy, explained. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Oslo is the Tesla capital of the world. Follow Johnny on Facebook at for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe for Vox Borders. Instagram: Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: I spent a day in Oslo before traveling to Svalbard, and noticed that there were Teslas everywhere. Upon further investigation, I learned that the Norwegian government heavily incentivizes ownership of electric cars: Tesla doesn't pay a sales tax on the models it sells, electric car owners are exempt from automobile tolls, and they can charge their vehicles for free. The catch is that Norway funds these initiatives through its sovereign wealth fund, which is almost entirely comprised of profits from Norway's oil and fossil fuel exports. Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Everyone’s complaining about the cost of back-to-school shopping, but mom blogger Dena Blizzard of “One Funny Mother” has a different take on things. » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: The Hilarious Back-To-School Mom Rant That Went Viral | TODAY


Carson Huey-You is only 14 years old but he will become Texas Christian University’s youngest graduate on Saturday. NBC’s Jacob Rascon reports for TODAY on the teen’s extraordinary academic story and his promising future. » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: Meet The 14-Year-Old Quantum Physics Whiz Who’s Already Graduating College | TODAY


Sandy Content has been a NICU nurse for 10 years. She believes God brought her to the NICU after her twin daughters were born at 24 weeks and 1 day. » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: NICU Nurse Sandy Content On Having The 'Greatest Job' In The World, Even On The Bad Days | TODAY


Scott and Michelle Schwab are speaking out for the first time about the day they lost their 10-year-old son Caleb. -- SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: Watch More on LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE:


A grandmother showed up in a courtroom to face the teenager who body-slammed her at a pool party. Nancy James, 68, asked a group of teens to lower the music at their party near her Florida house in May. Suddenly, she was body-slammed by a then-16-year-old, dragged and thrown into the pool. Prior to the incident, James had undergone hip and heart procedures. In July, James got to face Leon Balfour Joseph, who was charged with battery in the incident.


Audrey Doering and Gracie Rainsberry were separated in China and then adopted by two different American families who live miles apart.


Five high school students in Michigan are accused of throwing rocks off an overpass and killing a man. Kenneth White, a 32-year-old father of four, was riding home when a rock hit and killed him. The five suspects are 15 to 17 years old and all charged with second-degree murder. Adriana Diaz reports. Subscribe to the CBS This Morning Channel HERE: Watch CBS This Morning HERE: Watch the latest installment of Note to Self, only on CBS This Morning, HERE: Follow CBS This Morning on Instagram HERE: Like CBS This Morning on Facebook HERE: Follow CBS This Morning on Twitter HERE: Follow CBS This Morning on Google+ HERE: Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! --- Delivered by Charlie Rose, Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, CBS This Morning offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for CBS This Morning broadcast times.


That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost most directly are those experiencing homelessness. A few notes of thanks: First to Historian A. Roger Ekirch who kindly got me up to speed on the expansion of streetlights in historic western city districts. Another thanks goes to author Veronica Harnish, who outlined some of the pitfalls that people experiencing homelessness face when choosing between sleeping rough or utilizing emergency shelters. You can read her blog here: A third thank you goes to the staff at the Unites States Interagency Council on Homelessness — they supplied the map in this video, as well as some aggregate statistics of the United States homeless population. Those numbers come from a variety of annual ‘Point-In-Time’ counts. The 2018 event will take place in late January, and the process depends on volunteers — so if you'd like to participate, you can find your local organizer here: granteeSearch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Fighters are using hunger as a weapon. Jane Ferguson's reporting in Africa was supported with a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Read more: Subscribe to our channel! It's why South Sudan’s famine is man-made. And so are the 3 other famines developing in Nigeria, Somalia, and Yemen. Wars in these countries are threatening to starve 20 million people. or in all four countries, it's war that's threatened to put 20 million people at risk of starvation. To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Early this year, Kangana appeared on popular talk show Koffee with Karan and turned it around as she called the host Karan Johar a snooty flag-bearer of nepotism and called him a movie mafia. For More Videos Visit: Facebook: Twitter: Download India TV Android App: SUBSCRIBE to IndiaTV Here:


Diana Lovejoy collapsed in a California courtroom Monday after she was convicted in what authorities call a botched murder-for-hire plot targeting her now-ex-husband, who was shot in September 2016 but survived. Subscribe to the CBSN Channel HERE: Watch CBSN live HERE: Follow CBSN on Instagram HERE: Like CBSN on Facebook HERE: Follow CBSN on Twitter HERE: Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! --- CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.


In March 1974, Chinese farmers digging a well unearthed the greatest archaeological find of the century - the buried Terracotta Army. After coming across a life-sized human head made of clay in Xi’an, China, archaeologists were called in to investigate. What they found was extraordinary. Thousands of life-like terracotta figures from the Qin dynasty, fashioned 2,000 years ago to protect the First Emperor of China in the afterlife. Archaeologist Li Xiuzhen has worked on the site since the 1980s. Her team was the first to discover that each warrior was originally painted in bright colours. Please subscribe HERE World In Pictures Big Hitters Just Good News


It can start before a hurricane even makes landfall. Subscribe to our channel! Storm surge, or coastal flooding, tends to be the deadliest aspect of hurricanes. As wind from the storm pushes water onshore several feet above the normal tide, it can trap people in their homes, wash away entire houses, and make rescue missions harrowing and slow. And it's a big possible risk with Hurricane Florence. Read more and follow the storm on Vox.com: Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Actor Richard Dreyfuss takes on Tucker over the 9th Circuit court that blocked the Trump administration's attempts to withhold funds from sanctuary cities, explains why teaching civics in schools is vital and his Dreyfuss Civics Initiative is about Tucker


China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. Subscribe to our channel! China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


What was glorious Technicolor? It was a groundbreaking technology — but it was more than that, too. Find an extra commentary video here: To learn more, check out: The George Eastman Museum: Eastman's Technicolor Online Research: Barbara Flueckiger's website: Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook: In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the history of Technicolor: both the technology and the company. Many people recognize Technicolor from The Wizard of Oz, but the technology existed long before then. Two strip Technicolor and three strip Technicolor both revolutionized the film industry and shaped the look of 20th century film. But Technicolor also influenced movies through its corporate control of the technology. People like Natalie Kalmus shaped the aesthetic of color films, and directors redesigned their sets and films based on the Technicolor look that the company — and viewers — demanded. Though the process we traditionally recognize as Technicolor is no longer in use (the company does continue), the look remains influential even today. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Prince Harry, aged 33, and Ms Markle, aged 36, are to marry in the spring He said the stars were aligned when they fell in love and he proposed over roast chicken Appearing for photos outside Kensington Palace earlier, Prince Harry said he was thrilled The couple secretly got engaged earlier this month The Queen and Prince Philip are delighted for the couple Ms Markle is an actress and humanitarian campaigner Please subscribe HERE World In Pictures Big Hitters Just Good News


Why so many languages invented words for colors in the same order. Subscribe to our channel! In 1969, two Berkeley researchers, Paul Kay and Brent Berlin, published a book on a pretty groundbreaking idea: that every culture in history, when they developed their languages, invented words for colors in the exact same order. They claimed to know this based off of a simple color identification test, where 20 respondents identified 330 colored chips by name. If a language had six words, they were always black, white, red, green, yellow, and blue. If it had four terms, they were always black, white, red, and then either green or yellow. If it had only three, they were always black, white, and red , and so on. The theory was revolutionary — and it shaped our understanding of how color terminologies emerge. Read more on the research mentioned in this video: Cook, Kay, and Regier on the World Color Survey: goo.gl/MTUi9C Stephen C. Levinson on Yele color terms: goo.gl/CYDfvw John A. Lucy on Hanunó'o color terms: goo.gl/okcyC3 Loreto, Mukherjee, and Tria on color naming population simulations: goo.gl/rALO1S To learn more about how your language's color words can affect the way you think, check out this video lecture: goo.gl/WxYi1q Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook: Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.


TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen goes behind bars to interview David Solano, who’s serving 25 years to life for robbery and estimates he’s mugged more than 100 people. Now Solano reveals how to avoid becoming a victim of people like him. » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: Secrets To Avoid Getting Mugged: A Veteran Thief Reveals All | TODAY


Dannielynn Birkhead, 10, and her father, Larry Birkhead, describe their life today, 10 years after the death of Smith, a reality-TV star and former Playboy Playmate of the Year.


How two feuding countries are tearing apart the Middle East. Subscribe to our channel! The Saudis and Iranians have never actually declared war on each other. Instead, they fight indirectly by supporting opposing sides in other countries and inciting conflicts. This is known as proxy warfare. And it’s had a devastating effect on the region. Countries, especially poor ones, can’t function if there are larger countries pulling strings within their borders. And that’s exactly what's happening in the Middle East. The Saudi-Iranian rivalry has become a fight over influence, and the whole region is a battlefield. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


More from Inside Edition: Griffin Steele, 7, was at the gas station with his dad, Shane, in Myrtle Beach when he found a $20 bill covered in red dye on the floor. Imagine his surprise when he opened a nearby garbage can to find a bag full of stolen money inside. Steel said the rest of the cash was also covered in red dye so his dad called police immediately. It turns out someone had robbed a local TD Bank in Myrtle Beach just an hour earlier.


The 2014 film was an animation feat — but it was built on the legacy of homemade fan movies. Subscribe to our channel! When you watch installments of the Warner Bros. line of Lego movies, it's hard not to be struck by how realistic the animation is. It isn't quite traditional stop motion — but it sure looks as if it could be. That's largely thanks to the work of the animators at Animal Logic, a Sydney-based visual effects studio that has worked on The Lego Movie, The Lego Batman Movie, and the upcoming The Lego Ninjago Movie. Powered by live action filming techniques and a close attention to detail, the studio has helped reinvent what Lego animations can look like. But they owe a lot of that aesthetic to the influence of fan films. Since the early 1970s, enthusiasts have made home movies with their own Lego sets. They're called Brickfilms — and they've grown into a sizable community producing great movies and helping many young animators get their start. The Lego Movie animators learned from what made those home movies so good by embracing the limitations of the medium, and creating a world that anyone could could rebuild at home. Check out some of the Brickfilms we showed in this video: The Magic Portal: Journey to the Moon: Matrix 2003: Monty Python and the Holy Grail in Lego: Tapporalli 2020: Predator Montage: ONE: A Space Odyssey: Krieg der Steine: Batman Begins Montage: Delivery: Star Wars Brickfilm: Victim: For a great explainer on how to make your own Brickfilm at home, check out this video: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game. Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane. Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection — the way in which oil is applied to the lane can affect the speed and direction of your ball. These patterns are so important that recreational bowlers and professional bowlers bowl on vastly different patterns — the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) even classifies the patterns it uses in tournaments. Phil Edwards met with professional bowler Parker Bohn III at his childhood bowling alley, Howell Lanes in Howell, New Jersey. He guided Phli through the complex strategy a pro bowler uses when encountering different oil patterns. Not only do they have to assess which pattern is in use, but they also have to judge how that pattern changes as the oil shifts and slides over the day. Knowing how to play a specific lane can be the difference between a title and second place. But these patterns aren’t just for the pros — they’re relevant to recreational bowlers as well. Watch the video to see how you can use these patterns to step up your game. Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook: Subscribe to our channel! Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


With barely enough shelter to house even 11% of the homeless people on its main island, Hawaii lawmakers struggle for solutions amid rising costs of living and low wages. Subscribe to The Guardian ► But one group of homeless Hawaiians has taken matters into their own hands, forming a highly organized and self-sustaining community. Could a key part of solving Hawaii’s homelessness problem actually come from its homeless citizens? Become a Guardian supporter ► The Guardian ► Suggested videos: Erica: Man Made ► Battle for Mosul ► Radical Brownies ► Desert Fire ► 6x9: experience solitary confinement ► Gun Nation ► We Walk Together ► The last job on Earth ► Patrick Stewart: the ECHR and us ► Guardian playlists: Guardian Bertha Documentaries ► In my opinion ► Owen Jones meets ► US elections 2016 ► Guardian Animations & Explanations ► Guardian Investigations ► The Guardian's YouTube channels: Owen Jones talks ► Guardian Football ► Guardian Science and Tech ► Guardian Culture ► Guardian Wires ►


Filthy Frank is the embodiment of everything a person should not be. That’s not an evaluation or an opinion. It’s the first sentence of the “about” section of his YouTube channel. That said, though, it’s pretty accurate. Frank’s videos feature him “cooking” himself in a tub full of ramen, eating a cake made out of hair, and jumping onto strangers’ sandwiches in a park. And after a few years of being an internet anti-icon, he wants to leave the filth behind and become a musician, under his real name, Joji. Some of his fans aren’t too happy about this. VICE News hung out with him for a day to see if he’ll be able to make the transition from video troll to true artist. This segment originally aired on November 3, 2017, on VICE News Tonight on HBO. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


It's time to put up or shut the f**k up. Facebook @ FOLLOW Paul Joseph Watson @


It's definitely not hip-hop. Subscribe to our channel! For many, grime is an enigmatic genre of music. Its genesis at the crosspoint of dub, uk garage, dancehall, and hip-hop make defining the sound less than straightforward. But a recent wave of promotion positions Grime to make a splash in pockets of global culture moving forward. But to understand how grime overcame an initially sour reputation on its way to international stardom, you have to go back to the early 2000’s. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook:


When Stephanie Arnold went to the hospital for an emergency C-section, she predicted she would die. And she was right: she flatlined for 37 seconds. She tells Megyn Kelly that should could see what was happening in the OR and elsewhere during her near-death experience, and says she continues to have premonitions today. “I fought; It was not comfortable.” » Subscribe to TODAY: » Watch the latest from TODAY: About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: Find TODAY on Facebook: Follow TODAY on Twitter: Follow TODAY on Google+: Follow TODAY on Instagram: Follow TODAY on Pinterest: Meet The Mom Who Predicted Her Own Death (And Lived To Tell About It) | Megyn Kelly TODAY


Hidden parking rules hurt our cities. Will Chilton and Paul Mackie of Mobility Lab explain. Subscribe to our channel! The cities we live in are shaped by the way we get around them. Over the past 60 years, with more and more people opting to drive cars, the need for parking spaces has increased with the boom in driving. To accommodate that demand early on, cities and towns started requiring developers to include parking with their new buildings after World War II. These policies, known as mandatory parking minimums, set precise standards for parking spaces for each building. And these parking spaces don't come cheap. To learn much more on free parking's affect on cities, Donald Shoup's book is here: And Mobility Lab, who helped make this video, covers many more issues around infrastructure is here: Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: Follow Vox on Twitter: Or on Facebook: