When To Disclose Your ASD At Work

Над видео могла бы быть ваша реклама.
97 ratings | 1406 views
Под видео могла бы быть ваша реклама.


When To Disclose Your ASD At Work

Finding an Autism friendly job can be difficult. Today we look at when to disclose your asd and how to do it in a way that gives you an advantage. CHANNEL LINKS: Patreon: Facebook: Twitter: Written Blog: More Videos: Email: aspergersfromtheinside@gmail.com ----------------------------------------------- // WELCOME TO ASPERGERS FROM THE INSIDE!! My name is Paul and I discovered I have Aspergers at age 30. If you're new you can check out a playlist of some of my most popular videos here: Yes, I know, I don't look autistic. That's exactly why I started this blog, because if I didn't show you, you would never know. As the name suggests, this channel is devoted to giving you insight into the world of Aspergers. This blog started off being just my story, but I've learned SO MUCH about my own condition from meeting others on the Autism Spectrum that now I make sure to feature their stories as well. I've come a long way in my own personal journey. Now I'm sharing what I've found so you don't have to learn it the hard way too. ----------------------------------------------- // WHAT TO EXPECT FROM THIS BLOG I value your time which means there are NO YOUTUBE ADS on my videos. You can expect me to get to the point with concise useful information. I focus on what is most important and don't shy away from difficult topics. The best way to learn about Autism is to see it in real life ( i.e. via the stories of many, many people on the spectrum). In this channel I endeavour to show you what Autism and Aspergers look like in real people and to also give you some insight as to what's happening on the inside. I upload a new video every weekend with some bonus content thrown in mid-week too. There's always new stuff coming through so be sure to check back and see what you've missed. (Is this where I'm supposed to tell you to hit that subscribe button?) Topics Include: - What is Aspergers/Autism? - Aspie Tips, coping strategies, and advice on common issues - Learning Emotional Intelligence (this is my special interest!) - Autism in real life: stories from special guests Everything I do is and endeavour to go deeper and take you 'behind the scenes' to understand what may, at first glance, seem 'odd'. oh, and I love busting stereotypes and turning preconceptions upsidedown :) ----------------------------------------------- // ABOUT ME I discovered I have aspergers at the age of thrity. It has been my life's mission to understand these funny creatures we call humans. My special interest is a combination of emotional intelligence, psychology, neuroscience, thinking styles, behaviour, and motivation. (I.e. what makes people tick) My background is in engineering and I see the world in systems to be analysed. My passion is for taking the incredibly complex, deciphering the pattern, and explaining it very simply. My philosophy is that blogging is an adventure best shared. ----------------------------------------------- // EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TRAINING I also run autism friendly online emotional intelligence training. So if you like my direct, systematic style, and would like to improve your own emotional intelligence skills, check it out here: ----------------------------------------------- // CONTACT Blogging is an adventure best shared which means I'd love to hear from you! Feel free to leave me a comment or send me and email at any time and I'll do my best to respond promptly. Email: aspergersfromtheinside@gmail.com Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy this channel! I look forward to hearing from you! Peace, ~Paul

Comments to the video: When To Disclose Your ASD At Work

Sophia Neilsson 27 days ago
I told my manager when I got diagnosed; for me it was like Hey this will explain some of the stuff I've been having difficulty with!. Reaction I got? Haha, you don't have autism! Good joke! It was pretty distressing.
Aspergers from the Inside 27 days ago
:(
Benjamin Worters 1 month ago
Disclosing for me has never been difficult. But since I've been diagnosed i haven't held a single job. I'm trying to volunteer at the moment and even that isn't going smoothly. I think i might clam up about it for a tad to see if my situations take more favorable directions and get back to you all.
Furkan Cenk Kara 2 months ago
I just told one of my bosses, I have ASD not sure if I did the right thing or not yet. or the outcomes yet. I was first just a teacher there and was just doing my part with my students no need to involve lots of social interaction except with my students and my dealing strategies work perfectly. And I am good with technology and systems, setting schedules and planning stuff they also discovered during my employment and asked me to be a manager. That time I was really in between to tell them or not tell them. I went with the second. So now I shared apparently not to be shared info with other workers. So, in the end, hoping they will understand me better I told. It was a bit of feeling relaxed. But can't foresee long term effects. hope it will turn out OK.
Christina B. 3 months ago
Maybe if I can get my duck in a row I can get the job that everyone knows that I have autism and in the place I don’t feel ashamed about it because I’m that place I know how to work it in a positive and that’s a real great thing.
Cullen Tashiro 3 months ago
I was told to tell my manager because I have rights where I live. He (manager) just wanted me to keep working and that I’m slow. Christmas decorations cause autism.
Dave Scruton 4 months ago
I moved and am looking for a new job, my last boss knew and was very good at helping me. I am trying to decide if I will be discriminated against in hiring. most people think Autism and thing terrible behaved 5 year olds. My issue is I think i stand out trying to hide it.
Toto 4 months ago
I’ve been struggling with this. I usually only tell people I know who will understand, whether that means they’re family, close friends, or educated on asd, but my stepfather doesn’t want me letting anyone at all know about my aspergers.
Nataly Arciniegas Palacio 5 months ago
Hello Paul, I am a NT but I have been binging all night on your well-explained videos to educate myself. Once upon a time, long before I had heard of Asperger's, I was madly infatuated with a quirky coworker. I was a huge introvert but I gathered the courage to approach him and try to get to know him. I remember feeling so hurt and angry that he wouldn't even look at me in the eye (🤦), thinking he was so arrogant and eccentric. He liked to work alone most of the time and was a very efficient worker. He'd smile all the time when approached, almost like a rehearsed smile, and would continue to do so even when saying really hurtful things to me. I don't think he realized the magnitude of his words. He would then get upset because he didn't understand why I got upset. *Sigh* My love was one-sided and I moved away soon after so I never got to know him at a deeper level. At the time I got a really strong feeling that he was not your average guy. I am not sure if he had Asperger's/was neurodiverse but after watching many videos and considering the chance that he could possibly be so, I feel so terrible that back then I was very emotionally charged. I assumed everyone was able to read my body language easily (true for most but evidently not all people). Talking to me must have been hell for him 🤦🤦🤦 Since a long time has passed, I have reflected a lot and have made an effort to verbally explain what I'm feeling instead of assuming people can read it off my body language. Also I don't mind anymore if people don't make eye contact, there are other ways to know if they are engaged in conversation. I'm so grateful to have met him, he made me engage in deep self-analysis. I wish we had at least stayed as friends 😢 Relating this story to the video, if hypothetically he had Asperger's and I had been aware of it, I would not have thought he was an insensitive jerk for not making eye contact and being so blunt and hurtful. I would have researched what Asperger's meant and would have tried to make myself understood in alternative ways, or asked him directly what he would have found helpful to improve communication. In terms of the workplace, ours was very welcoming, open-minded and progressive (with regards to the people working there and the company itself). I'm sure that disclosing it would've benefited him for sure, especially with getting accommodations. They liked their workers to feel comfortable while on the job. Anyways sorry for the long message and thank you for making these videos, they are amazing and necessary. I hope one day people are more aware that neurodiversity is a thing and attitudes change for the better. Good Night.
Nataly Arciniegas Palacio 4 months ago
+Kenneth Huntington As someone who lost the chance to get to know a wonderful person due to ignorance and lack of awareness, I'm happy that you found my comment helpful 😊💛. I would love to know what exactly you found helpful. Have a great day/night! 😊
Kenneth Huntington 4 months ago
As an Aspie myself who has lost many people I liked being around due to being misunderstood this comment is super awesome and meaningful. Thanks!!!!!
JG Alegria 5 months ago
That's very true. Some work places are more open than others to making reasonable adjustments. There is also the option of working as a peer support which requires: be able to demonstrate how you are able to effectively, respectfully, and appropriately use your lived experience of a mental health issue in your work. In the public sector you can tick a box saying whether or not you have a disability/ require adjustments. If you don't want to identify as having a disability this would not be a suitable approach. At the film & sound archives one of our colleagues was going to move into our front of house area after a restructure but found it really overwhelming because of the amount of multi-tasking. They made a position for him in a different area that was more single focused and he was really happy about that. I have to say he was great at customer service though, which is why we thought he would be a suitable candidate. He was visible in his mannerism and also his main problem was coming late or not turning up at all sometimes - to his credit he always called us and we had to cover for him short notice. There are also targeted jobs for disability, so if someone was not able to manage the adjustments on their own and wanted a position where they could openly request and expect adjustments then that would be ideal.
Mary Hunter 5 months ago
I wouldn't tell people at work unless your autism is really obvious. In my experience there usually are played a lot of political games with backstabbing, gossip, etc. in the workplace. Why give them ammunition to attack you with? Even if you happen to find a place where there is less of this, people usually aren't really able to understand what it is anyway. You might explain things, but apparently it is very hard for people who have no experience with neurodiversity. They might want to be supportive, but often enough when push comes to shove they will think you're exaggerating or being a douchebag and they'll not accept that certain behaviour is a consequence of autism because they don't really grasp what it is. Then again. perhaps I've only worked at shitty places xD
VeryCherryBerry 1 month ago
That's exactly my experience
Aspergers from the Inside 5 months ago
to that definitely sounds like 'not a safe place'!
Norplinger 5 months ago
I've had quite an array of different responses. A lot of people said something like oh everyone's on the spectrum these days , which is dismissive and hurtful, I've had some people start speaking more slowly and using simple words as if I was suddenly stupid, which was just funny, but the best one was from a friend who is a computer programmer; he said so, you're an Aspie, huh? Cool, I always wanted to be one of those. It seems autistic people are already known and highly valued in the world of computer geeks. Thank you for representing us in such a positive light on the internet. Your videos are very practical and helpful and I have directed people to them on a number of occasions when I found it difficult to explain something. It's hard when you are emotionally involved in the thing you are trying to explain, especially if, by the time you are trying to explain it, there have already been misunderstandings and you're terrified to say anything in case you make it worse. Raising awareness is the key, but first we need to convince people that it is worth their while to learn about us, so it is really good to have somebody representing all the positive aspects of autism in a way that is so clear and accessible, demystifying some of the sillier things people believe, like that we have no emotions and prefer things to people. Thanks!
AmandarinPeel 5 months ago
Either way it's a double bind.
AmandarinPeel 5 months ago
When I was applied for my current job, I was reluctant to be out about my ASD. However, given that they work work kids with special needs they kind of worked it out and I was still hired. During my first few weeks I made the decision to preface myself to my colleagues as I can come across as arrogant and dismissive and I wanted to prevent and avoid conflict. Unfortunately, I don't think this was really taken in and understood by those colleagues as I still grated on others and this caused someone making a complaint based purely on my lack of awareness- instead of them just reminding me or telling me they were finding certain things a bit difficult. I applied for a higher position at my work, but didn't make it. The reasons weren't given but I strongly suspect it was in part due to me having a 'difficult' personality :( It's really quite frustrating and disheartening.
Eliscia Severin 5 months ago
It’s hard to answer this question for me. Personally I’d bring it up if it warranted it but it’s not a bad idea to keep it to yourself in certain situations. For me, I do not hide the fact that I’m on the spectrum on social media nor do I keep it secret with various people ‘be worked with. Interestingly enough I have an interview with a company next week that advocates for and organizes events for autistic people so I probably wouldn’t keep my diagnosis a secret.
jenlovesthisstuff 5 months ago
When I was diagnosed I was advised not to tell my employer.
crazyrussian86 5 months ago
jenlovesthisstuff I was never diagnosed with Aspergers in the US, however I was diagnosed with autism as a kid back in Russia. I’m also know I’m narcissistic as well. People told me I have Aspergers. Now, I don’t have any kind of diagnoses, but people at my job still treat me as an autistic person because of the way I act. They give me more accommodations I need and I don’t like it. It is like when people did not know, must job used to be hard, now they are giving me more accommodations I need. I actually don’t like it. I do have some autistic traits, but not a lot. I feel I should forgot about it, and I just say I can’t work and talk at the same time because I need to focus. I need to say I’m just not that fast worker and don’t mention any kind of diagnoses.
Color Me Zebra 5 months ago
And small after-thought I had.if one brings up their ASD when they are viewed as different, it could come off as being defensive. And thats not a good position either. I would think that, if someone will, more than likely, discover your difference on their own, it would then be best to put it out there initially. That way you can allow the information to be said on your terms (in a positive light). Just my two-cents. Good job. Your vlog is spot on.
JG Alegria 5 months ago
yep that's my perspective too. better to promote your advantageous and great qualities in light of neuro divergence and then add that you might need to ask for some help from time to time but play that down. this way you can draw attention to your great skills , whatever they are research or fixing all the systems or what have you
Stoke City 5 months ago
Color Me Zebra yeah, or when everyone is in a good mood from an experience you were directly involved with. Makes you seem more “human” and thus more receptive because you’ve shown for the most part you can act normal and fun
MAĤIAC 5 months ago
its funny how much this paralles with homosexuals. We are at the point homosexuals were a few decads ago with some being able to come out as gay depending on local situation, with few to no negative consequences and others wuld end up so horrably ostricised they might as well have been stoned to death.
JG Alegria 5 months ago
hmmm maybe but also maybe not. the issue people had with sexuality is moralistic and religious. the issue they have with Autism is purely ignorance of what it is. It's more like telling someone you're dyslexic or diabetic or something like that. they're not going to think you are gross or immoral but they may be completely ignorant
loedertje1984 5 months ago
I am gay ánd autistic. So 2 years ago I said to the therapist who diagnosed me: *sigh* oh no I just jumped from one closet into another.
Norplinger 5 months ago
It's true, and ABA is reminiscent of gay conversion therapy, it's all about appearances and nothing to do with acceptance.
MAĤIAC 5 months ago
I guess we need a slogan that is as catchy as the we're here we'er queer thing. sorry if some find this offensive
Autism Enlightenment 5 months ago
I discovered I was autistic 2 years ago almost to the date. I have needed to disclose 100% of the time moving forward. I feel like it's my duty to myself for my own dignity and understanding and others to represent the fact that we exist. I do need help but I also want to help others. I used to work with kids and teens on the spectrum. Now I really want to help adults - starting w myself.
Emiel Terzieff-Godefroy 5 months ago
thank you for teaching us more :)))
Dazik 5 months ago
I think the people I work closely with might have an idea, but I'm too afraid to tell most people about my difficulties. I am worried they'll take it as me trying to make excuses or even try telling me my experiences are invalid. I've had managers tell me they didn't believe I had any sort of condition, that I just make things up so I can act out when I want. Cause, you know, having a panic attack in the middle of the warehouse, where everyone is watching me meltdown, is totally my idea of a good time.
J Turkson-Baidoo 4 months ago
I can relate. I was working at a shop for 8 weeks last year and i had to leave because of the pressure and me having a panic attack :( even I disclosed my aspergers to the manager at the time, she still treated me like shit. I hate it when people start taking advantage.
James Heitmann 5 months ago
I know how you feel, I have had multiple meltdowns at work, most co-workers know this and try to help me by not putting me in certain situations.
OX 5 months ago
Iv'e often thought that attitudes to aspergers must differ from country to country, I reckon Germany would be the ideal place to live if your an aspie as they seem naturally methodically and flat in their emotional state. I guess a good measure of wether to disclose your autism status to an employer is how well covered you are by law in your country. By no means disclose your status in an interview or on your C.V unless you are contacting an Aspie Friendly employer as ignorant employers will just see it as another hurdle to deal with instead of realising the benefits.
Mathead 5 months ago
Anders Kilowatt I am happy for you to hear that you have never encountered any racism. I, for myself, can not say the same. I've been spontaneously insulted and called a Jew and once even a Turk many times, specially when traveling eastwards. As for Austria and Germany not being that different: don't be confused by the languages. I think there's a reason why Hitler went to Germany to pull off his plans. In fact, Austria and Germany are very different and always have been. Austria always had a flair of intercultural savoir-vivre and tolerance while Germany rather tends to paranoia and hostility towards anything out of the norm. The first possibly being the remains of the spirit of what once was a great empire versus a country that always had a hard time defining itself.
Mathead 5 months ago
Meg Nakano To the topic of being a foreigner in Germany, the first thing to arise are those to questions: where and from where. Being a foreigner from any southern country is, to begin with, very different from being one from northern countries. Eastern Germans tend to be extremely hostile to brown and black people. Southern Germans tend to be dismissive to them. In the rest of Germany, it's just not the same as being a Caucasian type. Caucasian foreigners are generally better received, with slight exception to Slavs who are seen as sort of sub-class. In any case, it's not nearly as easy as you describe. Have you lived as a foreigner in Germany or do you know anybody who did?
Meg Nakano 5 months ago
There's a benefit to being where you're a foreigner - people don't expect you to be the same, attribute some of the missed clues as being because you're a foreigner, the dislike of social situations as a foreign-language challenge fatigue. I agree that Germany might be a good country to be a resident foreigner in, as opposed to, for example, Brazil.
Mathead 5 months ago
You know what I think? Iceland 😋
Mathead 5 months ago
.also people can't make a clear point. Always beating around the bush. Say what you want, g*dd*mn! I can't understand you. Lots of problems with people taking advantage. Long waiting times for diagnose – very different results from place to place, some based on very old-fashioned criteria.
Maikind K. 5 months ago
Hi, Paul! In my case it actually worked in my favor: I was able to be tested through work (I work for a State agency that is here to help people with disabilities)! My actual case is confidential; my direct supervisor and people I trust heard first. Now I believe the whole office knows. For once it seems something worked in my favor. I don't exactly fit in, yet I am having a somewhat better time of it at work. I still avoid the social functions. You are a big part of my wanting to get tested: My reaction to your videos was: What--did he follow me around for the past fifty years?!! Many, many thanks, and fond greetings from Pennsylvania, Jim K.